Enjoy Montepulciano

Celebrating and promoting North American Montepulciano wines

About Montepulciano

Thought to be of Tuscan origins, Montepulciano is most prominently produced in the province of Abruzzo, on the eastern coast of Italy, as “Montepulciano d’Abruzzo”, which can include up to 10% Sangiovese. It should not be confused with “Vino Nobile di Montepulciano” which is made entirely from Sangiovese. It is widely produced in many of Italy’s other wine regions, but tends to end up in bulk wine.

Italian Montepulciano is generally felt to make for deep-colored, fresh, lighter wines with lower tannins, bright acids, and tangy red fruit accented by some earthy, leathery or, sometimes, gamey notes. It makes for approachable wines styled somewhere between Beaujolais and Pinot Noir. Others have described it as “uncomplicated, refreshing, easy-drinking.”

Montepulciano has found small footholds in the North American continent, primarily in Californian regions Such as Solano (Suisun Valley), Sonoma (Carneros), Contra Costa and Riverside (Temecula Valley) counties, as well as the Central Valley. It is also produced in Texas and North Carolina as well as in Mexico’s Valle de Guadalupe in Baja California.

In North America, not many have experimented with Montepulciano —alone or in blends. It seems to do well with Sangiovese. Petite sirah also seems to do well with this warm climate fruit. In addition to earthy and sometimes peppery, spice and leathery notes, this wine can show brighter red fruit characteristics like strawberry, raspberry, cherry and plum.

This wine is often described as “medium-bodied”, “fruity” and “easy drinking”.

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